Top 8 Reasons We Can’t Quote Your Submission

Every day we receive new business submissions from agents.  We love seeing new accounts come across that we can delve into!  Some agents really know their stuff and get us fully completed apps with all the extra bells and whistles needed for that spectacular submission.  But many times we, as brokers, find the submissions fall short and we have to go back and forth to get all the necessary information that wasn’t provided. Perhaps you have to do that, too, with your insureds.  We know how tough it can be!   It ends up being time consuming for all involved.

So, in order to form a more perfect union between us, here’s a list of reasons we normally find we can’t quote your submission:

  1. There is no Insured name on the application. Trust me, knowing the name of the insured you are going to write insurance for is important.  I know sometimes it seems we are mind readers but our clairvoyance doesn’t always extend to Insureds.
  2. The address is missing. Do they not have any address at all?  Are they living and working in their parent’s basement and are afraid to tell anyone? If that’s true, we still need their parent’s address.  I promise we won’t call their mom.
  3. Sales or receipts information is absent or just a guesstimate. It’s kind of important to give us that information so the account can be rated properly.  Also, there’s a big difference between $100,000 and $1,000,000 in receipts.  That extra zero can do a lot.
  4. The class codes are non-existent on the application. Yet another important piece of the rating puzzle.  Those codes give our carriers a better understanding of what the liability exposure is.  It also helps them determine the premium and any necessary exclusions.
  5. There is a bad explanation of the risk. Or no explanation of the risk.  We really do want to know what the insured is doing!  Plus sometimes the explanation helps solidify the class code to use, as there may be something that’s outside the norm.  If the company has a website that’s the most helpful – make sure you put that down!
  6. Property apps don’t have any pertinent information. You can’t just write down the address and hope for the best.  We have to know the year built and when the last updates were on ALL things (plumbing, electrical, roofing, etc.).  Is it a single home or a duplex?  A vacant building or a warehouse?  These are the questions that keep us up late at night.
  7. The loss history hasn’t been included. I would LOVE to just take the insured’s word that they have never had a loss.  Unfortunately, we need proof in this business. And please, please, send loss runs that have just been run within the last 30-60 days.  We can’t hope that those loss runs you received in 2014 are still the same today.
  8. Expiring and Target premium hasn’t been advised. Nobody likes to spin their wheels, getting nowhere after a lot of hard work.  If we know the insured’s expiring premium and what number we need to work at being at or under, then we have a better chance of getting you a quote that your insured will like.

When it comes down to it, we’re here to help you give your insured the best coverage for the best price.  I know it may seem like we’re grumbling about these submissions, but it’s only so we can offer you our best.  We want you and your insured to be happy!

cathyCathy Thurber has over 10 years’ experience in the insurance industry and likes to think she’s learned a few things along the way, one of which being to not take herself too seriously.  She would love to say she has as many cool expertise’s as her fellow blogger, Ken Kukral, but she’s just not as old as him.  Cathy is a voracious reader and a total word nerd.  Most importantly, she’s been married to her favorite person for almost twenty years and has two kids that she actually likes.  However, the dog is her favorite child and she’s been wheedling for a cat for years.  Perhaps this is the lucky year?

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Time to read the ISO Manual again…

When I started in the insurance business some 30 years ago, I began as an underwriter.  This meant I needed to learn the “rules” and how to do rating if I was ever going to put out a quote.  As a wholesale broker I needed to figure out pricing, terms and how to sell the underwriter on accounts that were “submit”.  I always felt I needed to know a significant amount of information if I was going to have the “upper hand” with both carriers and clients.  This was my basis of eventually becoming a “coverage guy”.

Part of my initial training was reading and understanding specific sections of the ISO Commercial Lines Manual.  Without this, I wouldn’t have the necessary foundation of which to build on and understand the technicalities of this business.  I can’t tell you how many times I searched through the classification tables in order to find the most appropriate classification for an account.  There was not always one, so I needed to find the most appropriate one and then convince the underwriter to use that classification.  There were many times that there were additional “rules” associated with a classification and I needed to know how that impacted the account.

Some of the areas that were the most important were the following:

  • Minimum state payrolls. Each state has their own minimum owner payroll and many carriers had modifications to that.  A mistake here could result in a mid-term endorsement increasing the payroll and the agent and insured would certainly NOT be happy.
  • Premium basis. Understanding what each type of premium basis is and what was included was important.  Knowing if it was “each”, per $100 or per $1,000 could make all the difference in rating up the account.  A mistake here could result in a premium 10 times too high or too low.  Carriers also had modification to this such as contractors where they might rate per employee instead of payroll.
  • Details of what was included in payroll. Should executive payroll be included?  Clerical payroll?  Salesmen payroll?  Overtime or holiday double time?  Other forms of remuneration?  Knowing the rules here could help significantly reduce the premium basis and subsequently the premium.  This could mean the difference between writing an account or just narrowly missing it.  Since carriers allow for up to three years to audit an account, you can go back that many years and possibly get significant return premiums by properly applying the rules.  Do not assume the auditor knows all the rules.  You may also want to “school” your client on these rules so they properly keep track of proper payroll and do not have any surprises at audit time.  Also make sure your carriers do not have any modifications to these rules.  Know what Rule 24 is?  A clue, it gives many of the important payroll rules.  When you get bored one day, do an internet search or e-mail me and I will send you a copy.
  • Square footage. There are a few quirks here too.  Sometimes carriers base their premium basis on “customer accessible” square footage.  Calculating this out can sometimes make a significant difference.  I have also found that relying on county property records can be an issue.  The county property records may not have included a recent addition or change and will be picked up when the carrier inspects the property.
  • Additional insured endorsements. In over 90 percent of requests we receive to add additional insured’s, we are NOT given the specific endorsement that should be added.  This begs the question, if the wrong one is used, whose fault is it?  All requests for additional insured status should give what endorsement form number to be used, when it is to be effective, the interest of the party looking to be added as additional insured and any other specifications that are needed.  Using the wrong additional insured could even cost your client a bid for a job if they catch this detail and reject their bid, no fault of their own.  Keep in mind that certain additional insured endorsements are “free” and some may incur a charge per additional insured.  Talk to your client up front about how many they expect so you know if you should pursue a blanket additional insured or not.
  • Rule 85 – Know what this is? This the rule that defines the criteria for a specific risk on if the fire rate will be specifically rated or class rated.  A good risk is eligible to be rated after ISO inspects it and takes into account all fire protections.  This can make a risk come in with a much lower rate than if it was class rated.  You need to check the effective date of the rating and check with your customer to see if any changes were made since that time that would improve the fire rating.
  • Debits or credits – The ISO manual defines what the potential credits are bases on certain criteria. Of course carriers may have their own criteria that supersede this criteria so also know the modifications your carriers make and your authority to use this debits or credits.
  • Package credits – Who doesn’t like credits. There is a wide range of package credits based on classification.  Your carriers may also have modifications to these.
  • Deductible credits – Does your client have a higher tolerance to retaining risk? If so, you can quickly figure out how much they might save by going to higher deductibles.
  • Construction definitions – Questions on masonry versus masonry non-combustible? Definitions are here so you can properly determine the proper construction class.
  • Changes – ISO goes out of their way to discuss changes being made to classifications, rules or forms. You need to read and understand the changes so then when your clients ask about them, you are on top of them.  This is especially true if there is a reduction in coverage.  Keep in mind that carriers do not immediately accept changes and you need to watch for their adoption date.
  • Exception pages. There are always exceptions.  Many do not apply to what you are doing, but you need to make sure if they do.

While reading the ISO manual may not be an exciting read, it could help you out in writing business.  Knowing the rules will help you to use them to your advantage and show your client that you understand the minutia of your business so they don’t have to.  How much would your client love you if you were able to get them a return premium from the policy they previous wrote with another agent?  Think helping them out would help solidify the new relationship?  Just like in golf, it is important to know the rules so you can use them to your advantage.   Happy reading….

Ken KukralKenneth Kukral, CIC – VP of Special Risks – That means, call me if you need help on placing a unique, difficult, large or more complex risk. Kennethkukral@intlxs.com  800-937-3497 ext 2079

The Top 3 Reasons You Should Be Insured On St. Patrick’s Day

Though St. Paddy’s Day came and went quickly, there’s always time to be prepared for next year! Did you or your insureds run  into any of the below incidents this past week?

Las week we celebrated one of my favorite holidays– St. Patrick’s Day!  While I’m Irish every day, it’s always fun to celebrate my “Irishness” with a special day.  There’s nothing like eating corned beef, drinking something green, and dancing to a lively Irish jig.  Plus, I got to wear my “Kiss Me, I’m Irish” shirt!

There are, however, a few reasons you and your insured need to be insured on this green holiday.  Without further ado….a drum roll and some bagpipe music, please!

  1. Someone over-indulges while at your bar. Yes, we know this is a foregone conclusion.  However, while you may be smart enough to have liquor insurance on your location, let’s think about that individual.  There’s always the DUI to consider – which, hopefully they get pulled over before they do any damage.  Your car insurance company certainly won’t like you –if you’re not dropped then expect an aggressive increase in premium!  And what if they are smart enough to leave their keys and walk home?  Then to top that off they start dancing and singing Irish tunes while stopping traffic.  Well, that’s when they’re arrested for public drunkenness.  I’m not sure that any insurance will help them at this point.
  2. Assault and battery. Listen, just because we’re all enjoying ourselves while we get our Irish on doesn’t mean that you can start acting like a complete idiot.  I know some of you will want to!  But please, I ask you to refrain from making fun of short, red-headed people.  We are not leprechauns.  We do not have a pot of gold hidden somewhere.  What we are is Irish – and that means we have a temper.  So, be prepared to be taken down at the knees and then pray that we’ll stop there.   I’m also hoping that the bar we’re in has A&B coverage because they’ll probably need it after I get through with you.
  3. Green food problems. I know….everything is green on St. Patrick’s Day, even the Chicago River!  But what if your corned beef and cabbage turns into something toxic in a patron’s stomach?  Those potatoes shouldn’t have been green, either.  Well, get out that property and casualty insurance, because you’re going to need it!  File the claim, inform the health department if it’s more than one customer, and make sure everyone on staff has already taken their food-handling course.

cathyCathy Thurber has over 10 years’ experience in the insurance industry and likes to think she’s learned a few things along the way, one of which being to not take herself too seriously.  She would love to say she has as many cool expertise’s as her fellow blogger, Ken Kukral, but she’s just not as old as him.  Cathy is a voracious reader and a total word nerd.  Most importantly, she’s been married to her favorite person for almost twenty years and has two kids that she actually likes.  However, the dog is her favorite child and she’s been wheedling for a cat for years.  Perhaps this is the lucky year?

Tips for Quicker Insurance Quote Turnaround

Let us help you get quicker turnaround for your new business submissions! Take a look at some of our hints below:

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Co-Workers – Your Other Dysfunctional Family

 

“Remember – as far as anyone knows, we’re a nice, normal family.”

Ah, families.  Are there any truly “functional” families left or do we all have a smattering of dysfunction in them? Even when you leave the bosom of your family you end up at work….and with the people that have become like a second family to you.  We all know they’re just as dysfunctional!

According to the internet – which never tells a lie – a dysfunctional family includes conflict and misbehavior. We get those at work somehow or another, don’t we? Conflict arises occasionally between individuals who stand firm in their beliefs.  And misbehavior?  Well, I’m not going to tell any stories here but we all know those one or two people who may be slightly inappropriate.  In a good way, of course. But hey – those dysfunctions make us interesting!  And we are definitely a fun bunch of people.  We put the “fun” in dysfunctional!

In the office space there is always someone who has all the answers.  They have a sense of perfectionism.  Follow that one up by those one or two people who have all the problems.  Nothing ever seems to go right for them.  Then we have the few people that usually try to make everyone feel better.  They like to joke around and get people to smile.  And finally there are those that are quiet and keep to themselves.  We always wonder about those people…what are they really up to?  But, each of these individuals somehow works together and creates a whole, which moves the company forward in a positive manner.  We don’t know how it happens, but it does!

One way or another these people become more than your co-workers.  They become your friends and your “other” family.  You enjoy seeing them daily.  Some may be like that drunk uncle you only want to see on Thanksgiving, but you still find a place in your heart for them.  And when people ask you why you like your job, one of your top reasons becomes “I love the people I work with.”  And who would have thought that was possible?

cathyCathy Thurber has over 10 years’ experience in the insurance industry and likes to think she’s learned a few things along the way, one of which being to not take herself too seriously.  She would love to say she has as many cool expertise’s as her fellow blogger, Ken Kukral, but she’s just not as old as him.  Cathy is a voracious reader and a total word nerd.  Most importantly, she’s been married to her favorite person for almost twenty years and has two kids that she actually likes.  However, the dog is her favorite child and she’s been wheedling for a cat for years.  Perhaps this is the lucky year?

The Fear Blog

By Cathy Thurber

The other night my husband and I were relaxing on the couch when all of a sudden it sounded like a herd of elephants were stampeding upstairs.  It got quiet then the booming of running feet happened two more times.  We heard our daughter adamantly talking to….someone?  Before we could get up and check it out, down the stairs she comes and dramatically exclaims, “Sorry about the noise, guys!  I was almost just killed by a spider – but I got him!”  My daughter has a definite case of arachnophobia.  Here is an idea of how she reacts to spiders:

12

Fear of spiders is definitely a common phobia.  I have what I call the “3 S-Fears”: Snakes, Spiders, and Sharks.  I’m not alone, though, as spiders and snakes are two of the top biggest fears.  According to www.fearof.net, they are the #1 and #2 phobias in the world.  There’s also fear of heights (acrophobia), fear of small spaces (claustrophobia), and fear of open or crowded spaces (agoraphobia).  But, what about those not so common fears?  Fears that we rarely hear about?  Try these on for size:

  • The fear of balloons: globophobia
  • The fear of love: philophobia
  • The fear of buttons: koumpounophobia
  • The fear of bananas: bananaphobia
  • The fear of cotton balls: sidonglobophobia
  • The fear of snow: chionophobia
  • The fear of opinions: allodoxaphobia
  • The fear of beautiful women: venustraphobia
  • The fear of work: ergophobia
  • The fear of belly buttons: omphalophobia
  • The fear of chickens: alektorophobia
  • The fear of knees: genuphobia
  • The fear of losing cell phone contact: nomophobia
  • The fear of people in traditional Dutch costumes: dutchphobia
  • The fear of zombies: kinemortophobia

 

Did any of your fears end up on that list?  I hope not!  Although I wonder if anyone will try calling off sick because of ergophobia….

cathyCathy Thurber has over 10 years’ experience in the insurance industry and likes to think she’s learned a few things along the way, one of which being to not take herself too seriously.  She would love to say she has as many cool expertise’s as her fellow blogger, Ken Kukral, but she’s just not as old as him.  Cathy is a voracious reader and a total word nerd.  Most importantly, she’s been married to her favorite person for almost twenty years and has two kids that she actually likes.  However, the dog is her favorite child and she’s been wheedling for a cat for years.  Perhaps this is the lucky year?

 

Construction Conundrum

A variety of tools on wood.

This summer has been a collection of home improvement jobs at our household, between painting and building a deck. The painting is something I’ve handled before, multiple times, but building a large deck was something new. We have never tackled any structure of this magnitude before, but were pretty sure of ourselves and our capabilities. Well, I should say my husband was sure of himself, because he had friends who had an “idea” of how to do it. I mostly stood on the sidelines at the beginning and “supervised” until I was put to work. The construction, of course, did not go anywhere near as we planned it. Here are a few tidbits I have learned while attempting our first deck:

1. Big, strong guys are a necessity. Digging 3-foot holes, encountering multiple tree roots, hauling huge, heavy 20-foot boards – this isn’t for the weak or for just one person to handle. Make sure you’re nice to your friends early on so they’ll show up when you call! Thank God for our family and friends who came to help – we couldn’t have done it without them.

2. If it’s an outside project, it will rain every day you are able to work on it. Granted, I wasn’t sure if we were living in Cleveland, Ohio or Seattle, Washington for most of this summer, but every day we were able to work on the deck it started raining the second we stepped outside. Of course, it was sunny and dry on the days we couldn’t get to it.

3. Math skills are a definite must. I wish I had paid more attention in geometry now. Angles, angles, angles. That’s what woodwork seems to be about. I can hear my high school geometry teacher saying, “I told you so.”

4. There will be multiple trips to Home Depot. Daily. I’m pretty sure some of those trips weren’t even necessary…they were just to talk me in to buying more items for the deck. And who knew you would need a million deck screws?

5. Measure twice, cut once. Actually, it was more like measure 4 times, cut once. We measured the area it needed to go twice and then measured the board twice. That was after cutting a few boards too short and wasting valuable wood. Of course, it could have also been because I wasn’t paying attention when he told me the number. I’m not confessing to anything, though. Back to Home Depot we go!

6. Assume you will annoy at least one of your neighbors. Or, they will annoy you. It’s going to happen. You’re either using your hammer too early in the morning, your circular saw when their child is napping, or they don’t want their “natural” view blocked. And it doesn’t matter if you got along before the building started….somebody is going to be peeved about something.

7. Everything takes way longer than expected. That deck that was supposed to be completed by the end of June? Yeah, it’s about 70% done. I’m pretty sure there’s no end in sight at this point.

8. So, you say it’s only going to cost a couple thousand dollars….try again! You may want to add another thousand. Or two. All those extra trips to Home Depot really add up. Especially those deck screws.

Now we are waiting on an additional delivery of more decking stuff to arrive. I’m pretty sure we’ll have to go back to Home Depot for more wood and deck screws. Always deck screws. Can you tell I have an issue with those dang screws? Wish us luck to get this done…soon!

cathyCathy Thurber has over 10 years’ experience in the insurance industry and likes to think she’s learned a few things along the way, one of which being to not take herself too seriously.  She would love to say she has as many cool expertise’s as her fellow blogger, Ken Kukral, but she’s just not as old as him.  Cathy is a voracious reader and a total word nerd.  Most importantly, she’s been married to her favorite person for almost twenty years and has two kids that she actually likes.  However, the dog is her favorite child and she’s been wheedling for a cat for years.  Perhaps this is the lucky year?

I’m Bored!

By Cathy Thurber

Well, it’s that time of year again: Summer.

Can I get an Amen?

I’m so thankful that warmer weather and longer, sunny days are here.  However, it’s also another time of year at our house, perhaps at yours, too: the “I’m-bored-there’s-nothing-to-do” whine-fest from my children.  Well, one has a job now, so she doesn’t whine quite as much.  There’s just not as much time left to blow off in a day when you have to work.

Oh, we’ll be ok for possibly the month of June.  Now that’s school’s out they will ride their bike or drive their car to see friends for a week or so.  Then they go away to camp for a week.  But once July is here? Watch out! It will be a litany of how bored they are, there’s nothing to do, all of their friends are on vacation (why aren’t we on vacation??), and my personal favorite:  it’s too hot to go outside and play.  What?  My mother kicked me out of the house after 10am in the morning and didn’t want to see me until late in the afternoon.  I was just expected to stop home and get a quick lunch and something to drink somewhere in there.

Last year, much to my children’s dismay, I hung up a sign at the beginning of summer that went a little like this:

You say you’re bored?  Well, before you tell Mom and Dad how bored you are, you must have done all of the following:

B uild something.  A fort, a Lego house, something crafty, the next “big thing” (as long as it’s legal).

O utside….it exists.  Stare at clouds, dig holes, climb trees, do cartwheels…but do it for 40 minutes.

R ead a book for 20 minutes.

E xercise.  Run laps around the house, take a bike ride or a walk, stay inside and do pushups. 30 minutes!

D id you see the chore list?  More importantly, did you do your chores on the chore list?

Of course, my children are teenagers, so I don’t have to cater to them as much as when they were little.  But these are good activities for kids of any age.  I’ve also heard of parents putting ideas on slips of paper and then sticking those in a jar.  Whenever they phrase “I’m bored” comes out of a child’s mouth they pick out a slip and do what’s on it, be it a chore or something creative or fun. I try to make sure it has nothing to do with screens (TV, Xbox, i-phone, etc.) this way it engages their mind more.  So, the next time your child tells you they’re bored….point to the list or give them a slip of paper.   It’s quite handy.

cathyCathy Thurber has over 10 years’ experience in the insurance industry and likes to think she’s learned a few things along the way, one of which being to not take herself too seriously.  She would love to say she has as many cool expertise’s as her fellow blogger, Ken Kukral, but she’s just not as old as him.  Cathy is a voracious reader and a total word nerd.  Most importantly, she’s been married to her favorite person for almost twenty years and has two kids that she actually likes.  However, the dog is her favorite child and she’s been wheedling for a cat for years.  Perhaps this is the lucky year?

5 Things that Drive Me Crazy

crazy

You know what drives me crazy?  Mondays.  Mondays make me crazy.  I always feel like the weekend was never long enough.  I was ruminating on this during my drive in to work this morning while I was in the fast lane behind somebody going the speed limit.  Yes – you’ve got it – something else that drives me crazy!!  So as I was pondering these two things that absolutely get under my skin I began to prepare a list in my head.  I figured I would be oh-so-kind and share my top five with all of you.  Because I bet they annoy you, too!

  1. Slow drivers in the fast lane. I know, I know.  I already mentioned that above.  But, come on, people!  If you are not going 10 miles over the speed limit then you SHOULD NOT be driving in the passing lane.  Why?  Because you are not passing anybody!  They are all passing you.  And they’re not telling you you’re number one, either.
  2. Stepping on Legos. Could anything hurt any more than this?  Oh, the agonizing pain!  Especially since it is usually so small you never see the darn thing and the surprise on top of the pain just takes the cake.  It’s become the perfect curse to put on someone:  I hope you step on a Lego.  Beware how you use this.  It’s a diabolical curse that could come back on you.
  3. Incorrect spelling in a published document. Now, don’t get me wrong: spelling mistakes in general annoy me.  But when the mistakes are in a published document?  Dude!  Have you ever heard of this thing they call spell-check?!? It’s this fancy new tool you’ve been able to use for, oh, the past few decades.  Not to mention a second reading is always good to do.  Ya know…so the grammar/spelling police don’t have seizures when they read your work of art.
  4.  That’s right.  I’m not even breaking this down to a specific part of Walmart like employees or service.  It’s simply:  Walmart.  I hate that place.  I don’t know how I keep ending up back there.  And the Walmart by where I live?  HORRIBLE.  My attitude can go from perfectly pleasant to mostly malevolent within 10 steps.  Horrible customer service, long lines (because only two are open), self-check outs that don’t work, rude employees, oh, the list goes on and on.
  5. Automated answering systems for your utility provider. This includes calling your television or wireless provider.  Good God – can I just talk to a human?  Pretty please?  I’m tired of pushing twenty buttons to get to a real person.  It’s exhausting having to repeat yourself when the robot on the other end doesn’t understand you.  And to make matters worse, by the time you get to an actual person they ask you some of the same questions just to verify they have the right person!  Thanks for wasting my time twice!

I know there are numerous other things that annoy me.  These are just the few I picked today, probably resulting from things that happened on my too-short weekend.  Because it’s Monday already. And yes, spell-check, I know that previous sentence was a fragment.

cathyCathy Thurber has over 10 years’ experience in the insurance industry and likes to think she’s learned a few things along the way, one of which being to not take herself too seriously.  She would love to say she has as many cool expertise’s as her fellow blogger, Ken Kukral, but she’s just not as old as him.  Cathy is a voracious reader and a total word nerd.  Most importantly, she’s been married to her favorite person for almost twenty years and has two kids that she actually likes.  However, the dog is her favorite child and she’s been wheedling for a cat for years.  Perhaps this is the lucky year?

Raising A Resilient Child

Kids Superhero

When you’re a parent, you constantly wonder if you’re teaching your children to be independent; to be resilient.  Have you given them enough room to grow on their own?  Are they always looking to you for the decision to be made, or do they just ask your opinion and create their own resolution?  When harder times prevail do they crumble or do they find it within themselves to bravely move forward?  So many questions and worries we parents have!

I was skimming through the internet yesterday and came across an article entitled “10 Tips to Raising Resilient Kids (From a Former Navy Seal)” by Calvin Hennick.  Since I, of course, love anything having to do with Navy Seals, I had to click on the link and have a quick read.  Taken from Eric Greiten’s new book, these tips are spot-on to me.   In short form, here they are:

  • Be a role model
  • Make yourself useful
  • Practice gratitude
  • Teach responsibility
  • Don’t help kids (too much)
  • Let kids experience consequences
  • Allow for failure
  • Encourage risk taking
  • Exercise authority
  • Love your kids

Each one of these guidelines helps to instill a sense of independence in your child.  While always letting your child know that you love and support them is imperative, setting them up to have confidence in themselves and their decision-making capability is a major plus.  This is what we, as parents, need to strive for: raising compassionate, responsible, courageous, purpose-driven, and loving adults.

Please take a more in-depth look at these tips by reading Hennick’s article: https://www.yahoo.com/parenting/10-tips-to-raising-resilient-kids-from-a-former-114161116957.html

cathyCathy Thurber has over 10 years’ experience in the insurance industry and likes to think she’s learned a few things along the way, one of which being to not take herself too seriously.  She would love to say she has as many cool expertise’s as her fellow blogger, Ken Kukral, but she’s just not as old as him.  Cathy is a voracious reader and a total word nerd.  Most importantly, she’s been married to her favorite person for almost twenty years and has two kids that she actually likes.  However, the dog is her favorite child and she’s been wheedling for a cat for years.  Perhaps this is the lucky year?